elearn site

 
IELTS COURSES --> IELTS PRACTICE --> ACADEMIC READING
 Highlands and Islands
 
A Off the west coast of Scotland, in the Atlantic Ocean, lies a chain of islands known as the Outer Hebrides or Western Isles. The main inhabited islands are Lewis, Harris, North Uist and South Uist, Benbecula, Berneray and Barra. The Isle of Lewis is the most northern and largest of the Western Isles, and to its south, a small strip of land connects it to the Isle of Harris, making the two islands one land mass. To the south west of Harris are the two Uists with Benbecula wedged in between them. These three islands are connected by bridges and causeways. The small island of Berneray is connected to North Uist by a causeway and it is the only populated island in the waters around Harris. Eriskay is a tiny island, also populated, lying between South Uist and Barra. Off the tip of Barra lie the Barra Isles, formerly known as the Bishop’s Isles, comprising a group of small islands which include Mingulay, Sandray, Pabbay and Vatersay, and at the southernmost tip of the chain, lies an island by the name of Berneray, not to be confused with the island of the same name observed across the bay from Harris.
 
B Lewis is low­lying and covered in a smooth blanket of peatland. Harris is an island of contrasts. It displays a rocky coast to the east, yet white, sandy beaches to the west, backed by fertile green grassland (‘machair’), pockmarked with freshwater pools (lochans). North Uist is covered with peatland and lochans, whilst South Uist is mountainous to the east with machair and sandy beaches to the west. Benbecula is relatively flat and combines machair, peatland and lochans, with sandy beaches and deeply indented sea lochs. Like Harris, Benbecula and Barra exhibit a rocky coast­land to the east and low­lying machair to the west with sandy beaches similar to those seen on Berneray, which is a flat isle, except for a few hills, and sand dunes.
 
C Although part of Scotland, the Western Isles have a distinctive culture. Whilst English is the dominant language of mainland Scotland, Gaelic is the first language of more than half the islanders, and visitors to the islands can expect a Gaelic greet­ing. Gaelic signing and labelling reinforces the unique identity of the islands and helps to promote tourism and business. Place names on road signs are in Gaelic with only the main signs displaying English beneath. Visitors to the Western Isles may be surprised to find that the shops are closed on Sundays. The strong Christian tradition of the islands means that for the most part, the Sabbath is respected as a day of rest and leisure, especially on Lewis and Harris.
 
D There are approximately 27,000 people in the Western Isles and one­third of these live in and around the capital town of Stornoway, on the east coast of the Isle of Lewis. The town is served by an airport and ferry terminal making it the hub for Western Islands’ travel. Stornoway is best known for its world­famous Harris Tweed industry, which developed from a Murray tartan commissioned by Lady Dunmore in the 1850s. Only wool that has been hand­woven and dyed in the Outer Hebrides is permitted to carry the Harris Tweed logo. Other areas of economic activity include fishing, tourism, transport and renewable energy. Almost two­thirds of the population live on a croft, which is a particular type of smallholding peculiar to the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Crofters are tenants of a small piece of agricultural land, typically a few hectares, that usually includes a dwelling which the crofter either owns or rents from the landowner. The land must be used for the purposes of crofting, which can be described as small­scale mixed farming. Crofting activities include grazing sheep (lamb) and to lesser extent cattle (beef), growing potatoes, vegetables and fruit, keeping chickens, and cutting peat for burning on the house fire. Crofting can be likened to subsistence living, that is to say, living off what you can rear, grow and make, with anything spare going to market or shared with the community. Some people see crofting as a means of escaping the ‘rat race’ and getting closer to nature, though this romanticized view is naive. It is difficult to survive from crofting alone and most crofters have to supplement their incomes with a part­time job. Crofting as a way of life has been in decline. However, this trend may be about to reverse, led by consumer demand for high­quality produce, grown sustainably with the least environmental impact.

Do the following statements agree with the information given in the reading passage?
TRUE  if the statement agrees with the information
FALSE          if the statement contradicts the information
NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this.

1. The Isles of Lewis and Harris are joined together.
A. FALSE
B. TRUE
C. NOT GIVEN
Explain:


2. There are two islands called Berneray in the sea around Harris.
A. NOT GIVEN
B. FALSE
C. TRUE
Explain:


3. The sea around Benbecula is deep.
A. NOT GIVEN
B. FALSE
C. TRUE
Explain:


4. On the island of South Uist, there are fertile green grasslands and sandy beaches to the west and many islanders can speak Gaelic.
A. TRUE
B. FALSE
C. NOT GIVEN
Explain:


5. In the Western Isles most road signs are bilingual.
A. NOT GIVEN
B. FALSE
C. TRUE
Explain:


6. Approximately 9,000 people live in or near Stornoway.
A. FALSE
B. NOT GIVEN
C. TRUE
Explain:


7. Most crofters earn their living entirely from crofting.
A. FALSE
B. TRUE
C. NOT GIVEN
Explain:

Complete the table below. The passage described the position of the islands in relation to each other. There are four unnamed islands, A, B, C and D on the map below.
 
Map of The Western Isles
 

1. Lewis
A. island C
B. island A
C. island B
D. island D
Explain:


2. Eriskay
A. island B
B. island D
C. island C
D. island A
Explain:


3. Berneray
A. island D
B. island C
C. island A
D. island B
Explain:

The reading passage has four paragraphs, A to D. Choose the correct heading for the paragraphs A, B, C and D from the list ofheadings below.


1. Paragraph A
A. Population and economic activity
B. Environment
C. Sustainability
D. Landscape
E. Travel and tourism
F. History and heritage
G. Language and culture
H. Location
I. Life in the Western Isles
Explain:


2. Paragraph B
A. Travel and tourism
B. Language and culture
C. Population and economic activity Location
D. Sustainability
E. Landscape
F. History and heritage
G. Environment
H. Life in the Western Isles
Explain:


3. Paragraph C
A. Environment
B. Landscape
C. Population and economic activity
D. Life in the Western Isles
E. Travel and tourism
F. Sustainability
G. Language and culture
H. Location
I. History and heritage
Explain:


4. Paragraph D
A. Travel and tourism
B. Environment
C. Population and economic activity
D. Sustainability
E. Language and culture
F. Location
G. Life in the Western Isles
H. History and heritage
I. Landscape
Explain:

Total: 65 page(s)
Score: 0/10
No.DateRight ScoreTotal Score
 
PARTNERS
NEWS
Khai giảng lớp học tiếng anh miễn phí cho trẻ em nghèo

Triển khai chương trình hoạt động xã hội nhằm tích cực đóng góp cho cộng đồng

Báo Doanh Nhân Sài Gòn viết về trang web elearn.edu.vn

"Better English, Better Choice" (tạm dịch: Tiếng Anh tốt hơn, Lựa chọn tốt hơn) là khẩu hiệu của website ôn luyện tiếng Anh trực tuyến http://elearn.edu.vn.

 

BEES Group
Address: 57/8A Đường số 3, KP1, P.Tăng Nhơn Phú B, Q.9, TP.HCM
Tel: 0932 727 818
Copyright 2010-2020 - All Rights Reserved